Getting Back on Track: 5 Questions to Reset Your 2017 Intentions

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Time is flying by, and your intention to set a new habit or pursue a certain goal might have been left in the dust. If that’s the case, don’t fret–there’s still time to get back on the right track.

Since we’re about halfway through the year, now is a good time to circle back and evaluate your 2017 intentions. Here are some questions to help guide your mid-year reset:

1. What Was Your Original Intention?

Perhaps life got busy, and you haven’t thought of your January intention in a while. Look back in your journal or riffle through your mental files to recall what goal you set out to accomplish.

Once you find it, try writing it down again. Research indicates that writing down your goal could significantly boost your chances of accomplishing it. After you write down your goal, post it somewhere highly visible, like your bathroom mirror or on your refrigerator. The reminder will keep your intention front-of-mind.

2. To What Value Is This Goal Tied?

One of my friends wanted to start running and had a difficult time motivating herself. She realized that by getting in shape, she would inspire her children to lead healthy lives. Since family is one of her core values, this epiphany inspired her more than anything else could. She trained for and ran a 10K, and her children greeted her with big hugs at the finish line.

Research suggests that your core values can offer you willpower when the going gets tough. By linking your goal to one of your core values, you’ll be more likely to stick with it.

Are you unsure about your core values? Check out this list of values to find the ones that resonate most.

3. What Would It Feel Like to Take the First Step?

Athletes often use visualization techniques to practice their movements off the court or field, and you can use a similar technique to practice attaining your goal.

Try this simple visualization to help you stay motivated:

  • Begin by finding a comfortable position. Close your eyes and settle your mind with a few deep and cleansing breaths.
  • Imagine yourself accomplishing your goal or taking the first step toward accomplishing your goal. Try to create the moment with as much detail as possible by noticing where you are, what you see, what you’re doing, and who is there.
  • Now tune into your sensations. What do you feel and where do you feel the sensation? What does it feel like to meet your goal or to take the first step toward that goal?
  • Hold on to that feeling for a moment longer before opening your eyes.

4. What Words of Encouragement Can I Offer Myself?

You may often rely on others to boost you when you’re feeling low, but what happens when your friends and family aren’t around? You can offer yourself the same encouraging words you would share with a friend who needs support.

See what words work best for you, and offer them to yourself. Try phrases like, “Sara, you’ve got this,” or “Sara, you can do it.” Address yourself using your own name to help hammer home these motivating sentiments.

5. Who Can Support Me?

As I mentioned previously, writing down your intention may help you accomplish it. Your percentage of attaining it goes up even more if you share your goal with someone else, according to a study out of Dominican University.

Find a friend, family member, or co-worker who will encourage you and hold you accountable. Two of my friends have been my meditation accountability buddies for the past four years, and their encouragement has helped me keep my practice as a priority.

What other steps do you plan to make keep your goals for the year on track?


Learn the simple yet effective practice of Primordial Sound Meditation with Deepak Chopra to get your mind, body, and spirit back on track at Weekend Within. Learn More.


 

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About the Author
Sara Schairer is the founder and executive director of COMPASSION IT , a start-up nonprofit organization and global social movement whose mission is to inspire daily compassionate actions and attitudes. She created the one-of-a-kind reversible COMPASSION IT wristband prompting compassionate actions on six continents, 48 countries, and all 50 states. Wristband sales fund compassion education programs for youth, teens, and adults. As a public speaker, Sara encourages her audiences to “compassion it” in their daily lives. A Stanford-certified instructor of Compassion Cultivation...Read more